The God-Emperor's Inquisition

Mission: The Black Sarcophagus-4

Ref Inq/93638857-284:409
Author: [RESTRICTED]
Subject: Mission Analysis
Name: Black Sarcophagus
Location: Selian-17
Sector: Calixis
Access Grade: Inquisition Classified

The Black Sarcophagus

Not long after the nanobot discovery, the wall next to that very pool collapsed, revealing a peculiar sight. Around the edges of the opening, a different material was seen, one that exhibited traits of both stone and metal and it was a solid matte black. Some of the group, the techpriest among the first, entered this room and noticed the massive, rectangular object in the center of the room as well as the inset almost circuit-like patterns in the walls.

When the pilot had very little reaction to the wall collapse as well as his general nonresponsiveness to questioning by the temporarily attached psyker, she threatened him. This was the wrong course of action even without knowing his previous military service record. Upon being assaulted, he responded by throwing one of his concealed knives and making a light gash in her side. When she persisted, she wound up with another knife snagged in her flesh, though it was still only a slight wound. After this point, she seemingly learned her lesson.

Meanwhile, Zir, the cell’s primary psyker, came to a very disturbing conclusion about the room. Every area he had ever set foot in had a residual psychic reading from where humanity or even xeno races had left an imprint or felt some emotion. This area had none whatsoever. The feeling was so jarring to him that he backpedaled out of the room and into the main chamber that housed the springs. Praetus and Zarkov, on the other hand, had taken to conducting a closer examination of the sarcophagus and the nine hemispheres on its surface.

One experiment the techpriest initiated was to feed a slight bit of energy through his frame and see how a globe would react. The result was startling. The first hemisphere seemed to feed on his energy and began to glow a dull green, but when he attempted to draw his hands away, he found that he could not. The thing was siphoning off his power and another globe began to glow. Eventually, he was able to pull away with the help of the cleric, but against his better judgment (or not; the minds of those devoted to the Mechanicus are foreign in their workings to mere humans) he repeated the process, being pulled away if he were to lose consciousness, until all nine of the half-globes were glowing, their light providing a dim, eerie illumination of the matte black chamber. At the instant the last globe was powered, the entire sarcophagus lifted approximately 3cm off the floor and was able to be pushed with little effort. Another peculiarity soon showed itself when moving the object about, and that was that it seemingly lacked inertia and stopped immediately when Zarkov stopped pushing.

Of course, they reached the conclusion (Zarkov mostly) that this would be of great value to the Adeptus Mechanicus for further study and they hovered the box out of the black room to move it for transport. The pilot, however, had made himself scarce without a word to the group and was heading to his aircraft when the assassin noticed his absence. Rushing out into the freezing temperatures from the hot springs, her assassin’s training took hold and she barely felt the biting cold as her body followed a preprogrammed subconscious routine of circulation. She managed to get the pilot to stay for a few minutes more, though it was going to cost the group significantly per person to allow the “cargo” aboard. There was a storm coming as well, and this delay only increased the risk of being caught in it. The pilot knew more about the storms than the agents; rumors told of strange things that dwelt in the massive mountain storms that occasionally hammered this region of the planet. Things that scoured the mountain peaks and valleys. Outrunning them was going to be no easy task, but then again they were just rumours…

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Vangard

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